Parasites & Prevention

A parasite is an organism that feeds on the body of its host. He lives in this and will try to multiply. He will not kill his host but can seriously weaken it. Some parasites have a limited influence on their host, but others cause serious discomfort or illness. In addition to the risks for the dog itself, there are also those that are transmissible to humans. It is therefore essential that parasites are controlled thoroughly and effectively, especially if small children live in the area.

There are internal and external parasites. Internal parasites nestle in the body of your dog. External parasites are in the coat or on the skin. Common parasites are fleas, ticks and mites. Many problems can be prevented by good hygiene and preventive measures, such as regular checks, cleaning of the sleeping place. Protect your dog against parasites preventively to prevent complaints and infections. At Vetocambre we have various anti-parasitic means adapted to your dog's age and lifestyle. Some antiparasitic products for dogs are fatal for cats, caution is advised. So do not hesitate to ask for advice.

Internal parasites

Pups should be wormed at 2.4.6 and 8 weeks of age. Then every month until they are six months old. For adult dogs, this should be done once a year for animals that live in the home or live in isolation. Animals that come out a lot and are in contact with other animals, are best dewormed three to four times a year. Infections occur through contact with manure from other animals, by fleas and by hunting and eating prey.

Worms

Common types of worms in dogs are tapeworms, hookworms, whipworms and heartworms. Most of them are also contagious to people. Except for a reduced general condition, most worm infections are not fatal for your dog. Pups should be wormed at 2.4.6 and 8 weeks of age. Then every month until they are six months old. For adult dogs and cats living in the home or in isolation, this should be done once a year. Animals that come outdoors and are in contact with other animals are best dewormed three to four times a year. Infections occur through contact with manure from other animals, by fleas and by hunting and eating prey. If your dog is infected, deworming is necessary. In the case of worms that are transmitted by fleas, it is also important to combat the fleas.

Tapeworms

Tapeworms nestle in the small intestine of your dog and live there from the intestinal contents. If your dog is infected, you can find pieces of tapeworm in its stool. Those pieces look like rice grains. A tapeworm infection is usually accompanied by itching at the anus. Your dog will then slide over the floor while scratching.

Hookworms

Hookworms live in the small intestine of your dog. They have hooks and teeth in their mouths that damage the intestinal wall and cause intestinal infections. A severe infection is associated with anemia and diarrhea. You can recognize anemia in your dog due to pale mucous membranes, lethargy and reduced appetite.

Whipworms

Whipworms live in the colon and drill their head through the intestinal wall in search of blood and tissue fluid with which they feed. In doing so, they damage the intestinal mucosa and cause intestinal infections. Typical complaints with a whipworm infection are anemia, diarrhea and delayed growth in young animals.

Heartworms

An infection by heartworms is rare. In those few cases it is usually the French heartworm and that is dangerous. Dogs with heartworm infestation have a reduced appetite, coughing, vomiting and are anxious. Without treatment, the infection can lead to heart failure, breathing problems, lethargy and even death.
In order to prevent worms in your dog, give him a deworming treatment four times a year and ensure a hygienic environment. Do not hesitate to make an appointment for your next deworming treatment.